It’s Still Rock-n-roll To Me

There are a lot of advantages to digital music, but it can be confusing as you try to determine what format, bit rate and file size are best suited for any given hardware solution. If you love the idea of having access to the best digital music, but you feel intimidated by the conflux of software, hardware, bits and code, maybe this simple glossary will help you navigate towards the best music available.

Album Art An image that shows the physical cover original to the album, which can be duplicated digitally on a listening device.
Bit rate – The amount of data used in a given period of time to represent sound waves. This value will generally take the form of kilobits per second (kbps).
Burning – Term for writing data to a CD or DVD.
CD Recordable (CDR) – A compact disc onto which data or audio can be written once. Audio CDs can be recorded and played in car, home, and other standard CD players.
Codec – Short for “compression/decompression”, generally consisting of some mathematical algorithm used to both compress and store the CD audio, as well as playback to the compressed audio files.
Decoding – Generally refers to the process occurring behind the scenes by an audio player (such as an iPod), allowing the digital file to be converted into sound you can hear.
Encoding – The process of converting an uncompressed format to one of several compressed digital formats.
Kilobytes per Second (Kbps) – A unit of measurement generally used when discussing bit rate. A 128kbps file contains 128,000 bits of data for every second of content being stored. Uncompressed formats use approximately 1411 kbps, while a compressed format generally uses only 128-192kbps.
Metadata – Information about a particular CD, generally consisting of artist, album, and track information. Album information usually includes the year the album was released, its genre (jazz, rock, etc), and possibly album art.
MP3 – MPEG Layer III, by far the most commonly used, compressed digital audio format. The compression process results in files that can easily be transmitted over the Internet, written to CD/DVD, or stored on portable devices.
Normalization – A process which adjusts a number of audio files such that they seem to play at approximately the same volume.
Ripping – Also called digital audio extraction, this is the process of taking CD audio and recording it to a computer in an uncompressed file format (wav). When the transfer is from CD to MP3, the process consists of both ripping and encoding.
WAV – An uncompressed audio file generally used on PCs. CDs must first be extracted to wav files before they can be compressed to another format (see MP3, WMA, etc).
Windows Media Audio (WMA) – Microsoft’s proprietary audio codec designed to compete with MP3. Claims to offer competitive sound quality at lower bit rates.

The Best Ways On How To Download Music To An Mp3 Player

An MP3 player is different from the other methods of personal stereo where you would normally have to insert a cassette or CD in order to listen to your favorite songs, but the music found on an MP3 player is in digital format. Because they are much smaller than other methods of personal stereos they fit much more easily into a person’s pocket. Plus they are able to hold more tunes than either a cassette, mini disk or CD can. But in order to download music to your MP3 player you will need a computer. In this article we will provide some other information on how to download music to my MP3 player so that you can soon be listening to all your favorite tunes without having to swap over cassettes, CD’s or mini disks.

Well the most important thing that you will need in order that you can download music to your MP3 player is a PC that is connected to the Internet. However before you start to download any music to your MP3 player you will need to figure out the following.

What file format is it you need in order to download your music? The format you use will depend on the type of MP3 player that you have. For example if you have an Apple iPod then you will need to find files online which are in the AAC format before you start downloading whilst most other MP3 players come either in MP3 or WMA format. So it is important that you check in the user handbook which came with your MP3 player to see what format it is that you need to use.

Luckily when it actually comes to downloading music from the Internet you will find that there are plenty of online sites where you can download music either for free (but be wary of these sites), by paying a monthly or yearly subscription fee or those sites where you will have to pay for each song that you down load.

When you enter one of these sites and find the song that you are interested in they will then either ask you to pay a fee before you start the download procedure. Then once that this payment has been confirmed the download can begin. So just how to download music to my MP3 player is as simple as now just clicking the download button and once you have clicked on the ok to download button the site will then commence to download the song of your choice in to the appropriate file on your computer’s hard drive. Once the download has been completed then all you need to do is transfer it over to your MP3 player using a USB port and cable connected between the player and PC. It really is that simple.